To be immersed in a new city with such elegant beauty can be quite breathtaking and astonishing.  Astonishment was something I did not find myself short of while exploring Old Town in Prague upon our arrival. I was captivated by the number of statues around Old Town and discovered there is an undeniable magnificence and mystery held by these figures.  My intrigue piqued immediately and I became very eager to find the story behind the statues.

There is not a figure that does not hold some form of cultural relevance to the history of the Czech people.  From the tops of buildings, to the very ground you walk on, Old Town is heavily decorated with these statues.  This guy, for example, caught our eye while we were taking cover in the middle of an incoming storm.
David Cerny's depiction of Sigmund Freud signifying his constant fear of death. While trying to take cover from the incoming storm after dinner we looked up to inspect the sky and were momentarily shocked by this. At first glance we thought he was a real person. (Photo by Erica Torre)

While trying to take cover from the incoming storm after dinner we looked up to inspect the sky and were momentarily shocked by this. At first glance we thought he was a real person.
(Photo by Erica Torre)

This statue was done by the artist, David Cerny, in an attempt to depict well-known psychologist and psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.  Sigmund Freud was originally born in the Czech Republic.  Freud had a number of phobias, one of which was the fear of his own death.  This statue depicts Freud and signifies his constant battle with his fear of death.

 

The statue of Charles IV, founder of Charles Bridge. Stumbled across him as we were crossing Charles Bridge.  (Photo by Erica Torre)

The statue of Charles IV, founder of Charles Bridge. Stumbled across him as we were crossing Charles Bridge.
(Photo by Erica Torre)

Charles Bridge links the two sides of Prague and is decorated with thirty statues of saints and other significant figures of the culture’s history.  Charles IV, founded Charles Bridge in 1357.  This is the statue of Charles IV, which is one of the many found alongside the bridge.

There are many figures that tell a myriad of stories about the Czech Republic.  To get more insight on additional monuments in Prague this is an interesting website that has fascinating information.

Though stone may not be able to utter a single sound,  the statues themselves can speak thousands of words that chronicle the history of the Czech Republic and her people.  Those words echo through time and will exist in perpetuity.

 

Categories: Uncategorized

Comments are closed.

#kentinprague

 

Student Work